DIGIDAPTER Tips
How to get the most from your DIGIDAPTER

Actual uncropped photo using the DIGIDAPTER with a Canon S90 point and shoot at 200 feet
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CHOOSING A POINT AND SHOOT CAMERA
*3-6x OPTICAL ZOOM
*A large high quality LCD screen. Bigger is better
*Quality Optics
*Flat bottom camera body with tripod threads
*Camera lens diameter of less than 2.2” (measure with camera on and lens extended)
*Tripod hole to front of lens (camera on) less than 3.2”
*Maximum camera dimensions
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MICRO 4/3 CAMERAS
* 20-40mm lens (20mm usually works best)
*Maximum camera dimensions
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CAMERA SETTINGS
The following camera settings make a good starting point:

1. Timer set on 2 sec delay and multiple shots (2-3) to allow any vibration to settle before the picture is taken. Or better yet, use a remote shutter release.

2. Camera in Aperture Priority mode and set on widest aperture (lowest number),

3. ISO at 400 or more depending on light.

4. High shutter speed. 1/500 is a good starting point, more is better Crank up ISO if needed

5. Good light is essential for digiscoping. Fast shutter speeds minimize camera shake and blur.

6. Use the lowest zoom possible to achieve your shot.

7. If the camera has a user settable “C” or custom mode, use it to remember all your settings.

8. You may have to adjust the exposure + or - especially at higher zooms

OTHER ESSENTIALS

A sturdy tripod with a smooth video panning head is essential to keep your digiscoping setup stable. Cheap or light duty tripods will vibrate even in a slight breeze or touch of the hand causing camera shake. If possible a good quality, large diameter carbon fiber tripod is best.

NOTES FOR THE BEGINNER

Don’t get frustrated! Digiscoping is VERY challenging but extremely rewarding. It takes a thorough knowledge of your camera as well as understanding different camera settings and how that effects your shots. As you get better, your ISO and shutter speeds will drop and your photos will improve. We’ve all been there! Every camera and scope combination will work differently. Experiment until you find what works best. You are dealing with high magnifications that will magnify any errors.